We woke up early and made the short journey south from King Canyon to check out Sequoia National Park. The parks border each other, so the drive is short and most people group the two parks together as a sort of two for one when visiting them.

Our first stop was at the General Sherman tree. There is a big parking lot near General Sherman that I recommend you leave your car in while you take the shuttle around the park. It’s a small park but it’s busy and the roads get really congested, especially on weekends and in the summer. There are plenty of shuttles so the wait is never very long.

From the parking lot you can take a shuttle that will drop you off right in front of General Sherman. There is also a trail that connects the parking lot to General Sherman. The trail is through the sequoia forest and is only a half mile long, so obviously I decided to take the trail because I love looking at those giant trees up close and personal.

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General Sherman is the biggest tree on earth by volume. So he’s not the tallest or the widest, but he’s got the greatest amount of wood on him.

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Because he’s so big it’s hard to get a full shot of him. This one is pretty decent though. Especially when you look at how small the man in front of General Sherman looks.

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We looped all the way around General Sherman and made our way to the bus stop to catch a ride to the Giant Forest Museum. The museum is very small but it has a couple of really neat exhibits so it’s worth checking out for a few minutes.

Across the street from the museum is the Big Trees Trail. This is a paved loop trail that goes through a field surrounded by lots of big trees. It’s appropriately named, I suppose. It’s really easy and only 2/3 of a mile long, so really anyone can enjoy this trail.

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From the museum you can catch the bus that goes to crescent meadow. You have to take the shuttle if you want to go to this part of the park because no cars are allowed on this road. There are two other stops along the way at, Moro Rock and Tunnel Log. It was still early in the day so we decided to check out all three.

We had no Idea what Moro rock was when we got off the bus to check it out. We assumed it was just a cool looking rock. Nope. Here’s the sign you are greeted with when you get off the bus.

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Moro Rock is a giant mountain you can climb to get an incredible view of the park.  But it really is a difficult hike. It’s not very long, but it’s steep. Here’s a picture of the start of the trail. It gets much steeper that what you can see here.

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You’re basically climbing stairs the whole way up. There are some narrow parts that involve squeezing yourself through and there are some parts where the only thing between you and falling to your death is a little handrail. I’m terrified of heights and I really wasn’t bothered by this hike, so I think most people would be ok. Here are some people chilling at the top.

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And here’s the view from the top. It really was amazing.

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We made our way back down, which was a lot easier than going up, and hopped back on the shuttle to go check out Tunnel Log. This is just a quick stop for a photo op. There aren’t really any trails from this area. When the road was open to cars this used to be the log that people could drive their cars through.

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After we snapped our photos we got back on the bus to go all the way down to Crescent Meadow. There are quite a few trails in this part of the park and it really is beautiful everywhere you look.

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We decided to hike the mile long trail to Tharp’s Log. This is a giant fallen tree that a guy called Tharp turned into a cabin, complete with furniture and a fire place. It was really cool.

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A little ways from Tharp’s Log is the Chimney Tree. This is a sequoia that caught on fire and all that’s left is its outer shell. You can go inside of it and look up at the sky. It was pretty neat to see.

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The day was coming to an end so we took the bus back to our car and headed to our hotel for the night. There are plenty of campsites in Sequoia if you want to camp there. We had camped the previous three or four nights so were ready for a legit hot shower and comfy bed.

Have you been to Sequoia National Park? What did you think of the Giant Sequoias?

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